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A Lady Takes a Chance

A Lady Takes a Chance
A Lady Takes a Chance 1943.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byWilliam A. Seiter
Screenplay byRobert Ardrey
Story byJo Swerling
Produced byFrank Ross
Starring
CinematographyFrank Redman
Edited byTheron Warth
Music byRoy Webb
Production
company
Frank Ross Productions
Distributed byRKO Radio Pictures
Release date
  • September 15, 1943 (1943-09-15)[1]
Running time
86 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Box office$2.5 million (US rentals)[2]

A Lady Takes a Chance is a 1943 American romantic comedy film directed by William A. Seiter and starring Jean Arthur and John Wayne. Written by Robert Ardrey and based on a story by Jo Swerling, the film is about a New York working girl who travels to the American West on a bus tour and meets and falls in love with a handsome rodeo cowboy. The film was produced for RKO Radio Pictures by Frank Ross, who was Arthur's husband at the time.[3] The supporting cast features flamboyant comedian Phil Silvers, Hans Conried (without his stentorian Barrymoresque voice), Charles Winninger and Mary Field. The film earned a profit of $582,000.[4]

Plot

Three of her suitors protest when Molly J. Truesdale, on a whim, boards a bus in New York City to find out what life in the American West is like.

Molly goes to a rodeo, where a bucking bronco tosses rider Duke Hudkins right into her lap. Duke buys her a beer afterward and then Molly brings him luck while gambling, but his partner Waco warns her that Duke is not the right guy for her.

In a campfire, more worried about his horse than about her, Duke discovers his horse Sammy's blanket has been borrowed by Molly and is furious with her when Sammy catches cold. Giving up, Molly goes home to New York and her waiting suitors, who are astounded when a tall cowboy suddenly shows up and carries Molly away.

Cast

John Wayne and Jean Arthur in A Lady Takes a Chance
John Wayne and Jean Arthur in A Lady Takes a Chance

References

  1. ^ "A Lady Takes a Chance: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved April 24, 2014.
  2. ^ "Variety (January 1944)". New York, NY: Variety Publishing Company. February 10, 1944 – via Internet Archive.
  3. ^ Hal Erickson (2013). "A Lady Takes a Chance (1943)". Movies & TV Dept. The New York Times. Baseline & All Movie Guide. Archived from the original on November 13, 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  4. ^ Richard B. Jewell, Slow Fade to Black: The Decline of RKO Radio Pictures, University of California, 2016.
  5. ^ Landesman, Fred (August 13, 2015). The John Wayne Filmography. McFarland. ISBN 9781476609225 – via Google Books.
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A Lady Takes a Chance
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