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Aldrich Bowker

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Aldrich Bowker
Born(1875-01-01)January 1, 1875
DiedMarch 21, 1947(1947-03-21) (aged 72)
OccupationActor
Years active? – 1942

Aldrich Bowker (January 1, 1875 – March 21, 1947) was an American stage- and film actor.[citation needed]

Biography

Bowker was born in Ashby, Massachusetts.[1] He graduated from Fitchburg High School.[2] His debut came in Boston in a stage adaptation of The Christian, by Hall Caine.[3]

He was a long-time stage performer in Chicago and Cincinnati, and in summer stock at amusement park Whalom Park in Lunenburg, Massachusetts. Bowker was a pioneer in "open air" theatre at Whalom Park and at his summer home in Ashburnham, where other performers were frequent guests, including Ainsworth Arnold and Bette Davis.[citation needed]

Between 1912 and 1938 he was active on Broadway. Notable stage plays he performed in were The High Road (1912), A Night in Avignon (1919), You Can't Take It With You (1936) and 200 Were Chosen (1936).[4]

Between 1939 and 1942 he appeared in about 25 films,[citation needed] including Ball of Fire (1941).[5]

Bowker died at Patton State Hospital in San Bernardino, California, from arteriosclerosis and senility.[6]

Partial filmography

References

  1. ^ "Aldrich Bowker, Actor, Dies, 72; Native of Ashby". Fitchburg Sentinel. Massachusetts, Fitchburg. March 25, 1947. p. 1. Retrieved September 18, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  2. ^ "Bowker". Fitchburg Sentinel. Massachusetts, Fitchburg. March 25, 1947. p. 6. Retrieved September 18, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  3. ^ Irwin, Virginia (January 24, 1938). "Bachelor in a Grandpa Role". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Missouri, St. Louis. p. 2 D. Retrieved September 18, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  4. ^ "Aldrich Bowker". Internet Broadway Database. The Broadway League. Archived from the original on September 18, 2018. Retrieved September 18, 2018.
  5. ^ "Goldwyn Signs Aldrich Bowker". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. New York, Brooklyn. October 3, 1941. p. 27. Retrieved September 18, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  6. ^ Wilson, S. (2016). Resting Places: The Burial Sites of More Than 14,000 Famous Persons, 3d ed. McFarland, Incorporated, Publishers. p. 80. ISBN 9781476625997. Retrieved August 24, 2018.
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Aldrich Bowker
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