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Ebisu Station (Tokyo)

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Ebisu Station

恵比寿駅
Statue outside Ebisu station
LocationShibuya, Tokyo
Japan
Coordinates35°38′48″N 139°42′36″E / 35.646643°N 139.710045°E / 35.646643; 139.710045Coordinates: 35°38′48″N 139°42′36″E / 35.646643°N 139.710045°E / 35.646643; 139.710045
Operated by

Ebisu Station (恵比寿駅, Ebisu-eki) is a railway station in the Ebisu neighborhood of Tokyo's Shibuya ward, operated by East Japan Railway Company (JR East) and the Tokyo subway operator Tokyo Metro. The station is named after Yebisu Beer, which was once brewed in an adjacent brewery, and which is itself named for the Japanese deity Ebisu.

Lines

Ebisu is served by the following lines:

JR East station

EBSJA09JS18JY21
Ebisu Station

恵比寿駅
JR East station
JR station entrance in May 2016
Location1 Ebisu Minami, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo
Japan
Operated by
JR East
Line(s)
Platforms2 island platforms
Tracks4
History
Opened1906
Passengers
FY2019145,805 daily
Services
Preceding station
JR East
Following station
Meguro
JY22
Next counter-clockwise
Yamanote Line Shibuya
SBYJY20
Next clockwise
Ōsaki
OSKJS17
towards Zushi
Shōnan–Shinjuku Line
  Rapid
  Local
Shibuya
SBYJS19
towards Utsunomiya
Ōsaki
OSKJA08
Terminus
Saikyō Line
  Commuter Rapid
  Rapid
  Local
Shibuya
SBYJA10
towards Ōmiya

Platforms

The JR East station consists of two island platforms serving four tracks.


1 JY Yamanote Line for Shibuya, Shinjuku, and Ikebukuro
2 JY Yamanote Line for Shinagawa, Tokyo, and Ueno
3 JA Saikyo Line for Shinjuku, Ikebukuro, and Ōmiya
JS Shōnan-Shinjuku Line for Ōmiya, Utsunomiya, and Takasaki
4 JA Saikyō Line for Ōsaki
R Rinkai Line for Shin-Kiba
Sotetsu Line for Hazawa yokohama-kokudai and Ebina
JS Shōnan-Shinjuku Line for Yokohama, Ōfuna,Odawara, and Zushi
  • Platforms 1 and 2
    Platforms 1 and 2
  • Platforms 3 and 4
    Platforms 3 and 4

Station melody

The melody known as "The Third Man Theme" (or as the "Ebisu Theme" in Japan) is played at the platforms just prior to train departures.[1] This melody was used in Ebisu beer TV commercials. Most of the many of thousands of people who pass through the station each day probably do not realize that the song was made famous by the 1949 Orson Welles film noir, The Third Man, written by Graham Greene and featuring a very dark subject matter, the sale of fake penicillin in post-World War Vienna. The song, played on the zither by the previously unknown Austrian musician, Anton Karas, was a huge international hit in 1949 and 1950.

Tokyo Metro station

H02
Ebisu Station

恵比寿駅
Tokyo Metro station
Hibiya Line platforms in 2019
Location1-5-5 Ebisu Minami, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo
Japan
Operated by
Tokyo Metro
Line(s)H Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line
Platforms2 side platforms
Tracks2
Other information
Station codeH-02
History
Opened1964
Passengers
FY2019117,796 daily
Services
Preceding station Tokyo Metro logo.svg Tokyo Metro Following station
Terminus TH Liner Hiroo
H03
One-way operation
Naka-meguro
H01
Terminus
Hibiya Line Hiroo
H03
towards Kita-Senju

Platforms

The subway station has two side platforms serving two tracks.


1 H Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line for Naka-Meguro
2 H Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line for Roppongi, Ginza, Ueno, and Kita-senju
TS Tobu Skytree Line for Tōbu-Dōbutsu-Kōen
TN Tobu Nikko Line for Minami-Kurihashi

History

The station first opened in 1901 as a freight terminal for the neighboring Yebisu Beer factory. Passenger trains began to stop at the station on 30 September 1906.[2] The Tokyo Tamagawa tram line was extended to the station in 1927. In May 1945, the station building burned to the ground amid the bombing of Tokyo. The subway station opened on 25 March 1964[3] and the tram service was discontinued in 1967.

The Sapporo Brewery at Ebisu and its accompanying rail freight terminal were closed in 1982. The space was used for a "car train" service for several years before being redeveloped as the Ebisu Garden Place high-rise complex.

The Saikyo Line was extended to Ebisu in 1996. Through service to the Shonan-Shinjuku Line began in 2001, and to the Rinkai Line in 2002. Between 1996 and 2002, Ebisu served as the southern passenger terminus of the Saikyo Line, with Osaki Station being used as a turnaround point but not having passenger platforms connected to the line.

Chest-height platform edge doors were introduced on the two Yamanote Line platforms from 26 June 2010, the first time that such doors were installed on a JR line other than the Shinkansen.[4][5]

Passenger statistics

In fiscal 2019, the JR East station was used by 145,805 passengers daily (boarding passengers only), making it the 20th-busiest station operated by JR East.[6] In fiscal 2019, the Tokyo Metro station was used by an average of 117,796 passengers per day (exiting and entering passengers), making it the 30th-busiest station operated by Tokyo Metro.[7]

The daily passenger figures for each operator in previous years are as shown below.

Fiscal year JR East Tokyo Metro
1999 129,081[8]
2000 127,967[9]
2005 131,507[10]
2010 130,245[11]
2011 128,555[12]
2012 130,241[13] 98,217[14]
2013 133,553[15] 104,738[16]
2014 135,493[17] 107,471 [18]
2015 139,882[19] 111,149[20]
2016 143,898[21] 115,726[22]
2017 145,319[23] 118,260[24]
2018 147,699[25] 119,939[26]
2019 145,805[6] 117,796[7]
  • Note that JR East figures are for boarding passengers only.

See also

References

  1. ^ "恵比寿駅発車メロディー Ebisu station Departure melody". YouTube - Daichi Shimizu. Archived from the original on 21 December 2021.
  2. ^ JR East /info.aspx?StationCd=290 JR East Ebisu Station information[permanent dead link] Retrieved 4 March 2010. (in Japanese)
  3. ^ Terada, Hirokazu (July 2002). データブック日本の私鉄 [Databook: Japan's Private Railways]. Japan: Neko Publishing. ISBN 4-87366-874-3.
  4. ^ JR East press release: "山手線恵比寿駅、目黒駅のホームドア使用開始日について" (Introduction of platform doors at Yamanote Line Ebisu and Meguro Stations) (4 March 2010). Retrieved 4 March 2010. (in Japanese)
  5. ^ "山手線恵比寿駅でホーム可動柵の使用を開始 (Platform doors enter operation at Yamanote Line Ebisu Station)". Japan Railfan Magazine (in Japanese). Koyusha Co., Ltd. 27 June 2010. Retrieved 28 June 2010.
  6. ^ a b 各駅の乗車人員(2019年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2019)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Archived from the original on 14 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  7. ^ a b 各駅の乗降人員ランキング [Station usage ranking] (in Japanese). Tokyo Metro. Archived from the original on 10 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  8. ^ 各駅の乗車人員(1999年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 1999)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 6 September 2014.
  9. ^ 各駅の乗車人員(2000年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2000)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Archived from the original on 9 October 2014. Retrieved 6 September 2014.
  10. ^ 各駅の乗車人員(2005年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2005)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Archived from the original on 9 October 2014. Retrieved 6 September 2014.
  11. ^ 各駅の乗車人員 (2010年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2010)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Archived from the original on 6 October 2014. Retrieved 6 September 2014.
  12. ^ 各駅の乗車人員(2011年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2011)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Archived from the original on 8 October 2014. Retrieved 6 September 2014.
  13. ^ 各駅の乗車人員(2012年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2012)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Archived from the original on 7 October 2014. Retrieved 6 September 2014.
  14. ^ 各駅の乗降人員ランキング (2012年) [Station usage ranking (2012)] (in Japanese). Tokyo Metro. Archived from the original on 14 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  15. ^ 各駅の乗車人員(2013年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2013)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Archived from the original on 14 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  16. ^ 各駅の乗降人員ランキング (2013年) [Station usage ranking (2013)] (in Japanese). Tokyo Metro. Archived from the original on 14 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  17. ^ 各駅の乗車人員(2014年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2014)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Archived from the original on 1 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  18. ^ 各駅の乗降人員ランキング (2014年) [Station usage ranking (2014)] (in Japanese). Tokyo Metro. Archived from the original on 14 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  19. ^ 各駅の乗車人員(2015年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2015)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Archived from the original on 11 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  20. ^ 各駅の乗降人員ランキング (2015年) [Station usage ranking (2015)] (in Japanese). Tokyo Metro. Archived from the original on 28 October 2020. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  21. ^ 各駅の乗車人員(2016年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2016)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Archived from the original on 12 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  22. ^ 各駅の乗降人員ランキング (2016年) [Station usage ranking (2016)] (in Japanese). Tokyo Metro. Archived from the original on 14 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  23. ^ 各駅の乗車人員(2017年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2017)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Archived from the original on 1 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  24. ^ 各駅の乗降人員ランキング (2017年) [Station usage ranking (2017)] (in Japanese). Tokyo Metro. Archived from the original on 14 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  25. ^ 各駅の乗車人員(2018年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2018)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Archived from the original on 1 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  26. ^ 各駅の乗降人員ランキング (2018年) [Station usage ranking (2018)] (in Japanese). Tokyo Metro. Archived from the original on 14 January 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
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Ebisu Station (Tokyo)
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