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Edmund P. Dandridge

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The Right Reverend

Edmund Pendleton Dandridge

D.D.
Bishop of Tennessee
Edmund Pendleton Dandridge, Bishop of Tennessee (Episcopal).jpg
ChurchEpiscopal Church
DioceseTennessee
In office1947–1953
PredecessorJames M. Maxon
SuccessorTheodore N. Barth
Orders
OrdinationDecember 1908
by George William Peterkin
ConsecrationSeptember 20, 1938
by Henry St. George Tucker
Personal details
Born(1881-09-05)September 5, 1881
DiedJanuary 28, 1961(1961-01-28) (aged 79)
Lexington, Kentucky, United States
BuriedNorborne Parish Cemetery, Martinsburg, West Virginia
NationalityAmerican
DenominationAnglican
ParentsLemuel Purnell Dandridge & Isabelle Lawrence
SpouseMary Robertson Lloyd (m. Oct. 6, 1909)
Children2
Previous post(s)Coadjutor Bishop of Tennessee (1938-1947)

Edmund Pendleton Dandridge (September 5, 1881 – January 28, 1961) was fifth bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee, serving from 1947 to 1953.

Biography

Dandridge was born on September 5, 1881 in Flushing, Queens, New York City, the son of Lemuel Purnell Dandridge and Isabelle Lawrence. He was ordained deacon in June 1906 by William Loyall Gravatt, Coadjutor Bishop of West Virginia and priest in December 1908 by George William Peterkin, Bishop of West Virginia. He served as rector of Christ Church in Nashville, Tennessee. On April 20, 1938, he was elected Coadjutor Bishop of Tennessee and was consecrated on September 20, 1938 by Presiding Bishop Henry St. George Tucker. He succeeded as Bishop of Tennessee on January 5, 1947. He resigned on September 20, 1953 and died on January 28, 1961. He married Mary Robertson Lloyd on October 6, 1909.[1][2]

During Dandridge's tenure as Tennessee Diocesan, the diocese grew at a far larger rate than perhaps in any prior period in its history, mainly due to suburban development in the four major cities of the state and the missions and parishes erected to serve them. Growth proceeded to the point that, by the 1980s, the statewide body had been divided into three dioceses, one for each major region of Tennessee.

References

  1. ^ "A Short history of ten bishops of Tennessee Episcopal Church 1834-1993", Diocese of Tennessee. Retrieved on 30 September 2018.
  2. ^ " Edmund Pendleton Dandridge, Sr ", Find a Grave. Retrieved on 30 September 2018.


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Edmund P. Dandridge
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