Henry Berman - Wikiwand
For faster navigation, this Iframe is preloading the Wikiwand page for Henry Berman.

Henry Berman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Henry Berman
Born(1914-01-14)January 14, 1914[1]
DiedJune 12, 1979(1979-06-12) (aged 65)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
OccupationFilm editor and producer
Spouse(s)Rosemary
Children3 sons, 1 daughter
RelativesPandro S. Berman (brother)

Henry Berman (January 1, 1914 – June 12, 1979) was an American film editor for RKO and a film producer for MGM.

Early life

Henry Berman was born to a Jewish family[2][3][4] in Newcastle, Pennsylvania in 1914. His father Henry (Harry) Berman was general manager of Universal Pictures during Hollywood's formative years.[5]

Career

Henry began his career working in a film laboratory at Consolidated Film Industries in the 1930s. He also worked in the lab for Universal Pictures. In 1933, he joined RKO as an editor and worked on musicals including the Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers films Follow the Fleet and Swing Time (both 1936), which were produced by his older brother Pandro S. Berman. He became assistant to Pedro and moved with him to MGM in 1940.[5]

During World War II, Berman served in the US Army with the rank of captain and worked with Frank Capra on the documentary film series Why We Fight.[5]

Some of the films he produced at MGM after the war include Just This Once (1952), Torch Song (1953), Men of the Fighting Lady (1954), Bedevilled (1955), It's a Dog's Life (1955), and The Great American Pastime (1956).

He won the Academy Award for Best Film Editing for Grand Prix in 1966.[6]

He died in Los Angeles of cancer.[5]

Awards and Nominations

Year Award Category Entry Result Ref.
1967 39th Academy Awards(Oscars) Best film editing Grand Prix (1966) Won [7]
1976 Primetime Emmy Awards Outstanding Achievement in Film Editing for Entertainment Programming for a Special Babe (1975) Nominated [8]
1973 Primetime Emmy Awards Outstanding Achievement in Film Editing for Entertainment Programming - For a Special or Feature Length Program of a Series Go Ask Alice (1973) Nominated [9]

References

  1. ^ Katz, Ephraim; Fred Klein; Ronald Dean Nolan (1998). The International Film Encyclopedia (3rd ed.). New York: Harper Collins. p. 122. ISBN 0-333-74037-8.
  2. ^ The Jewish Chronicle: "Revealed: the truth about the 'Jewish' Hollywood" by Michael Freedland September 5, 2015
  3. ^ Allan, John B. (July 5, 2011). Elizabeth Taylor. Blackbird Books. ISBN 9781610533232.
  4. ^ Brook, Vincent (December 15, 2016). From Shtetl to Stardom: Jews and Hollywood: Chapter 1: Still an Empire of Their Own: How Jews Remain Atop a Reinvented Hollywood. Purdue University Press. p. 17. ISBN 9781557537638.
  5. ^ a b c d "Obituaries". Variety. June 20, 1979. p. 86.
  6. ^ "Services Scheduled Friday for Producer Henry Berman". Los Angeles Times. June 14, 1979. p. 28. Retrieved June 21, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "1967 - Oscars.org - Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences". Oscars. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  8. ^ "28th Emmy Awards Nominees and Winners". Emmys. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  9. ^ "25th Emmy Awards Nominees and Winners". Emmys. Retrieved 4 May 2021.

Henry Berman at IMDb


{{bottomLinkPreText}} {{bottomLinkText}}
Henry Berman
Listen to this article