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Jeanne Spencer

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Jeanne Spencer
Born
Jeanne Genevieve Spencer

November 29, 1897
Covington, Kentucky, USA
DiedJuly 18, 1986 (aged 88)
Encinitas, California, USA
OccupationFilm editor
Spouse(s)Frank Ware
RelativesDorothy Spencer (sister)

Jeanne Spencer (sometimes credited as Jeanne Spencer Ware) was an American film editor active from the 1920s to the 1930s.[1] Her younger sister, Dorothy Spencer, was also a film editor.

Biography

Jeanne was born in Covington, Kentucky, to Charles Spencer and Catherine Spellbrink. She was the eldest of the couple's children. After high school, she got a job working for her uncle at The Cincinnati Enquirer.

By the early 1920s, she was living in Hollywood and working as a film cutter, although she didn't receive credits on her earliest projects. She also worked as an assistant director in those early days (notably on 1920's The Devil's Pass Key).[2][3][4] In the early 1920s, she married fellow editor Frank Ware; sadly, he died at the age of 39 in 1932.

She continued editing after Frank's death and also took up writing plays. She sold her play Senate Page Boys (co-written with Albert Benham) in 1939 and helped write the adaptation that became 1941's Adventure in Washington.[5]

Selected filmography

As editor:

As screenwriter:

As assistant director:

References

  1. ^ "Original Play to Be Filmed". The Los Angeles Times. 1 Jul 1933. Retrieved 2019-05-19.
  2. ^ a b Koszarski, Richard (2001). Von: The Life and Films of Erich Von Stroheim. Hal Leonard Corporation. ISBN 9780879109547.
  3. ^ "The Devil's Passkey (1920) - Notes - TCM.com". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved 2019-05-19.
  4. ^ Koszarski, Richard (2001). Von: The Life and Films of Erich Von Stroheim. Hal Leonard Corporation. ISBN 9780879109547.
  5. ^ Hopper, Hedda (3 Oct 1939). "London Tells English Movie Players to Stay in Hollywood". The San Francisco Examiner. Retrieved 2019-05-19.
  6. ^ Curtis, James (2015-11-17). William Cameron Menzies: The Shape of Films to Come. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. ISBN 9781101870679.
  7. ^ "Special Screening: Ramona (1928)". UCLA School of TFT. Retrieved 2019-05-19.


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Jeanne Spencer
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