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Joseph Kaufman (director)

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Joseph Kaufman
Born1882
DiedFebruary 1, 1918(1918-02-01) (aged 35–36)
New York City, U.S.
Other namesJoseph Kauffman
Occupationfilm director
Spouse(s)Ethel Clayton
(m. 1915; his death 1918)

Joseph Kaufman (1882 – February 1, 1918) was an American silent film actor and director prominent during the World War I years. He was born in Washington, D.C. and died in New York City.

Kaufman graduated from Georgetown University.[1] His wife was silent film star Ethel Clayton.[2]

Kaufman started out as an actor appearing on Broadway in Mistakes Will Happen (1906) and The Pretty Sister of Jose (1903)[3] with Maude Adams.[citation needed] His other Broadway credits included Three Twins (1908), Caught in the Rain (1906), Twiddle-Twaddle (1906), and La Belle Marseillaise (1905).[4] He acted in a troupe of Henry B. Harris.[1]

He eventually changed to acting in and then directing silent films, his output being numerous short films. As American films began to expand to feature length, Kaufman followed suit. He proved particularly adept and popular at directing beautiful Broadway actresses, including his wife Ethel Clayton. He directed Pauline Frederick, Marguerite Clark, and Billie Burke. His last film, The Song of Songs (1918), starred Elsie Ferguson.[5]

Kaufman organized the Motion Picture Directors Association.[2]

As actor he is reported to have had three teeth knocked out in a screen fight with actor Earl Metcalfe.[6] Following his death in February 1918, both of his parents died—his mother on April 9, 1918 and his father on April 18, 1918.[7]

Kaufman died of pneumonia on February 1, 1918 at New York's Polyclinic Hospital. He was 35 years old. His funeral was held at the Funeral Church on Broadway and 66th Street [8]

Selected filmography

Ethel Clayton and Joseph Kaufman in A Woman Went Forth (1915)
Ethel Clayton and Joseph Kaufman in A Woman Went Forth (1915)

References

  1. ^ a b "'Wireless Kaufman'". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. July 13, 1913. p. 26. Retrieved June 22, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ a b "Actor world pays homage at bier of Joseph Kaufman". The Washington Times. D.C., Washington. February 8, 1918. p. 12. Retrieved June 22, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Joseph Kauffman (sic)". Internet Broadway Database. The Broadway League. Archived from the original on June 22, 2020. Retrieved June 22, 2020.
  4. ^ "Joseph Kaufman". Internet Broadway Database. The Broadway League. Archived from the original on June 22, 2020. Retrieved June 22, 2020.
  5. ^ Silent Film Necrology, 2nd Edition by Eugene Michael Vazzana ; c.2001 page277
  6. ^ "In the Studios", New York Daily Mirror, May 5, 1915
  7. ^ Kaufman's Parents Die, VARIETY, April 26, 1918
  8. ^ "Joseph Kaufman Dead", The Evening World, February 2, 1918


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Joseph Kaufman (director)
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