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Marjorie Daw (actress)

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Marjorie Daw
Daw, 1924
Born
Marguerite E. House

(1902-01-19)January 19, 1902
DiedMarch 18, 1979(1979-03-18) (aged 77)
OccupationActress
Years active1914–1929
Spouse(s)
(m. 1923; div. 1925)

(m. 1929; div. 1942)
Children1

Marjorie Daw (born Marguerite E. House;[1] January 19, 1902 – March 18, 1979) was an American film actress of the silent film era. She appeared in more than 70 films between 1914 and 1929.

Career

Born in Colorado Springs, Colorado, Daw was the daughter of John H. House. She took her stage name from Marjorie Daw, a short story by Thomas Bailey Aldrich.[2] Daw began acting as a teen to support her younger brother and herself after the death of their parents. She made her film debut in 1914 and worked steadily during the 1920s. She retired from acting after the advent of sound film.[3]

Daw in 1920
Daw in 1920

Personal life

Daw married director Alfred Edward Sutherland on April 20, 1923, in Beverly Hills;[1] they had no children, and they divorced in 1925. On January 23, 1929, Daw married Myron Selznick in New York City. They had a daughter, Joan, and were divorced on April 3, 1942.[4][3]

Daw died on March 18, 1979 in Huntington Beach, California, aged 77.[5]

Partial filmography

Year Title Role Notes
1914 The Love Victorious
1915 The Unafraid Irenya Alternative title: The Unexpected
The Captive
1916 The House with the Golden Windows A Fairy Alternative title: The House of the Golden Windows
1917 Joan the Woman Katherine
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm Emma Jane Perkins
A Modern Musketeer Elsie Dodge
1918 Headin' South
Mr. Fix-It Marjorie Threadwell
He Comes Up Smiling Billie Bartlett
1919 The Knickerbocker Buckaroo Rita Allison
His Majesty, the American Felice, Countess of Montenac
1920 Don't Ever Marry Dorothy Whynn
Dinty Ruth Whitely
1921 The Butterfly Girl Edith Folsom
A Motion to Adjourn Sally Bleeker
Cheated Hearts Muriel Bekkman
Fifty Candles Mary-Will Tellfair
Patsy Margaret Vincent
1922 The Lone Hand Sue De Muidde
Love Is an Awful Thing Helen Griggs
The Pride of Palomar Kay Parker
1923 Rupert of Hentzau Rosa Holf
The Call of the Canyon Flo Hunter
Going Up Grace Douglas
Mary of the Movies herself
1924 Human Desires Joan Thayer
Virginian Outcast Madonna Webster
The Passionate Adventure Vicky
Notch Number One Dorothy Moore
1925 One Way Street Elizabeth Stuart
East Lynne Barbara Hare
1926 The Highbinders Hope Masterson
Redheads Preferred Angela Morgan
1927 Why Girls Say No Becky
Outlaws of Red River Mary Torrence
Topsy and Eva Marietta
Home Made The Girl
Buffalo Bill's Last Fight
Spoilers of the West Miss Benton
1928 The Heart of General Robert E. Lee Virginia Hale
The Skywayman Nancy Feldmore
1929 The Air Derby
The Cloud Patrol

References

  1. ^ a b "Marjorie Daw marries". The New York Times. April 22, 1923. p. 5. ProQuest 103185723. Retrieved January 2, 2021 – via ProQuest.
  2. ^ "Marjorie Daw Marries: Film Actress Wed to Myron Selznick in Municipal Chapel". The New York Times. January 24, 1929. p. 34. ProQuest 105095901. Retrieved January 2, 2021 – via ProQuest.
  3. ^ a b Lowe, Denise (2004). An Encyclopedic Dictionary of Women in Early American Films, 1895–1930. Haworth Press. pp. 164. ISBN 0-7890-1843-8.
  4. ^ "Marjorie Daw Gets a Divorce". The New York Times. Associated Press. April 4, 1942. p. 18. ProQuest 106462663. Retrieved January 2, 2021 – via ProQuest.
  5. ^ Katchmer, George A.; Cary, Diana Serra (2002). A Biographical Dictionary of Silent Film Western Actors and Actresses. McFarland. p. 87. ISBN 0-7864-0763-8.
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Marjorie Daw (actress)
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