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Quintin E. Primo Jr.

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The Right Reverend

Quintin Ebenezer Primo Jr.

D.D., L.H.D.
Suffragan Bishop of Chicago
ChurchEpiscopal Church
DioceseChicago
Elected1971
In office1972-1985
Other post(s)Interim Bishop of Delaware (1986)
Orders
OrdinationJune 28, 1942
by John Durham Wing
ConsecrationSeptember 30, 1972
by John E. Hines
Personal details
Born(1913-07-01)July 1, 1913
Liberty County, Georgia, United States
DiedJanuary 15, 1998(1998-01-15) (aged 84)
Hockessin, Delaware, United States
NationalityAmerican
DenominationAnglican
ParentsQuinton Ebenezer Primo & Alvira Wilhelmina Wellington
SpouseWinifred Thompson
Children3

Quintin Ebenezer Primo Jr. (July 1, 1913 – January 15, 1998) was suffragan bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Chicago from 1972 to 1985. He also served as interim bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Delaware from January 1 to November 8, 1986.

Early life and education

Primo was born in Liberty County, Georgia on July 1, 1913, the son of the Reverend Quinton Ebenezer Primo, a priest from British Guiana, and Alvira Wilhelmina Wellington. He was educated at Saint Augustine's College High School in Raleigh, North Carolina and received his diploma at Fort Valley Normal and Industrial Institute in Albany, Georgia in 1930. In 1934 he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from Lincoln University and then received a Bachelor of Sacred Theology from Lincoln University in 1937. He then completed a Master of Divinity from Virginia Theological Seminary in 1941. Primo also received degrees from General Theological Seminary and Seabury-Western Theological Seminary in Evanston, Illinois.[1]

Ministry

Bishop John Durham Wing of South Florida ordained Primo as a deacon on July 13, 1941, then as a priest on June 28, 1942, on both occasions in the Church of St Agnes, Miami.[2] He was presented by his father, then rector of St. Matthew's Church in Delray Beach, Florida. Between 1941 and 1942, Primo served as curate at St Agnes' Church in Miami, Florida before moving to North Carolina in 1942 where he became priest-in-charge of three parishes; St. Gabriel's Church in Rutherfordton, Good Shepherd Church in Tryon and St. Andrew's Church in Green River. In 1944 he accepted a position as priest-in-charge of St. Stephen's Church in Winston-Salem.

Between 1945 and 1947 Primo served as priest-in-charge of St. Timothy's Church in Brooklyn, New York, before moving to Rochester, New York to become priest-in-charge of St. Simon's Church in 1947, of which he became rector in 1961 after the church became a parish. Primo also worked to create the parish of St. Matthew's Church in Wilmington, Delaware after becoming priest-in-charge of the mission in 1963, succeeding in 1966 as the mission became a parish with him as rector. In 1969, Primo moved to Detroit, where two years later he managed to merge the Church of St. Matthew, a predominantly black congregation, with the historic and predominantly white St Joseph's parish, creating St Matthew's-St Joseph's Church.[3]

Bishop

In 1972, Primo was elected Suffragan Bishop of Chicago and consecrated on September 30, 1972, in the Cathedral of Saint James by Presiding Bishop John E. Hines. Primo remained in Chicago till 1985 and then served as Interim Bishop of Delaware from January 1 to November 8, 1986 and assisted there until his death.

Death and legacy

On November 8, 1986, when Primo died in Hockessin, Delaware.[4] He helped found the Primo Center, which remains today.[5]

References

  1. ^ QUINTIN EBENEZER PRIMO, JR., The Episcopal Church. Retrieved on 06 November 2019
  2. ^ "Ordinations". The Living Church. 105 (2): 15. July 19, 1942.
  3. ^ The Right Reverend Quintin Ebenezer Primo, Jr., 1913-1998, Archives of the Episcopal Church. Retrieved on 06 November 2019
  4. ^ Quentin Primo Jr., Episcopal Bishop,' Chicago Tribune, Lola Smallwood, January 18, 1998
  5. ^ http://www.primocenter.org/index.htm Primo Center
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Quintin E. Primo Jr.
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