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She Wrote the Book

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She Wrote the Book
Directed byCharles Lamont
Written byOscar Brodney
Warren Wilson
Produced byJoseph Gershenson
Warren Wilson
StarringJoan Davis
Jack Oakie
Mischa Auer
CinematographyGeorge Robinson
Edited byFred R. Feitshans Jr.
Music byEdgar Fairchild
Production
company
Distributed byUniversal Pictures
Release date
  • May 31, 1946 (1946-05-31)
Running time
80 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

She Wrote the Book is a 1946 American comedy film directed by Charles Lamont and starring Joan Davis, Jack Oakie, and Mischa Auer.[1] The screenplay concerns a shy midwestern professor who travels to New York City to visit a publisher of her friend's book which turns out to be a racy bestseller.

Plot

Jane Featherstone (Joan Davis) is a buttoned-down and pedestrian professor at small town Croyden College in Great Falls, Indiana who is making plans to present a paper in New York City. While talking to her dean's wife, Phyllis Fowler, she discovers that Fowler is actually the author of the racy best selling novel Always Lulu, under the nom de plume of Lulu Winters. Fowler asks Featherstone to assume her faux identity in order to pickup her royalty checks while in New York, and Featherstone reluctantly agrees to pickup the $80,000 which Fowler has promised to donate to the college which is struggling financially. While traveling on the train to New York, Featherstone meets Eddie Caldwell, a charming engineer, and the two agree to a date once they reach the big city.

Once they arrive Featherstone is greeted by publisher George Dixon and Jerry Marlowe, his advertising executive. Dixon and Marlowe attempt to escort her to an unexpected reception for Lulu. Featherstone tries to escape, but cracks her head in the process, and develops amnesia. Marlowe thinks she is Lulu, and Featherstone now believes she really is, which leads her to believe that the sultry novel is actually an autobiography of her life. When Featherstone, as Lulu, informs everyone at the press conference that she has no plans to write a sequel, Dixon and Marlowe hatch a scheme to spend the $80,000. Meanwhile Caldwell believes that Featherstone actually is the promiscuous Lulu, and ends the budding relationship. A bartender masquerading as a Count, an enamored shipping magnate, and photos that are seen back in Great Falls add twists and turns to the plot. Eventually Featherstone returns home broke, but does recover her memory.

Now the Fowlers and Featherstone must devise a plot to recover the money, or stand by and watch the college close due to lack of funds. Featherstone returns to New York and dons the guise of Lulu once more. She gets the money back, and reconciles with Caldwell, who then returns to Great Falls with her.

Partial cast

References

  1. ^ Stephens p.261

Bibliography

  • Stephens, Michael L. Art Directors in Cinema: A Worldwide Biographical Dictionary. McFarland, 1998.


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