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Liz McGregor

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Liz McGregor is a South African author and a journalist who worked for leading South African newspapers such as the Sunday Times and the Rand Daily Mail. Some of the books written by McGregor include and Load-shedding: Writing On and Over the Edge of South Africa and Khabzela: The Life and Times of a South African.[1][2]

Biography

McGregor was born in Cape Town.[3] McGregor left South Africa in 1985, returning in 2002 to work on a story commissioned by New York Magazine.[4]

Work

McGregor profiled the life of South Africa's popular radio DJ, Fana Khaba, in Khabzela: The Life and Times of a South African (2005).[4] The book was called a powerful and compassionate study by the Journal of Southern African Studies.[4] In Who Killed the Rain Queen? (2007), McGregor investigates the death of a Limpopo rain queen at age 25.[5]

McGregor's work, The Springbok Factory (2013), looks at the women in the lives of the Springbok Rugby players.[6] The book also examines the divide between black and white rugby players in South Africa.[7] McGregor spent two years researching her book.[6] The Cape Times called The Springbok Factory "a riveting study of the inner workings of South African rugby."[8] This book made her a "household name" in South African rugby circles.[3]

References

  1. ^ "Author Profile: Liz McGregor". exclus1ves.co.za.
  2. ^ "About Liz McGregor". bookslive.co.za.
  3. ^ a b Naik, Sameer (17 August 2013). "Scrumming Down with the Boks; Author Chats about Her Third Book on SA Rugby". The Saturday Star (South Africa). Archived from the original on 18 November 2018. Retrieved 7 March 2016 – via HighBeam Research.
  4. ^ a b c Marks, Shula (1 December 2007). "Science, Social Science and Pseudo-Science in the HIV/AIDS Debate in Southern Africa". Journal of Southern African Studies. 33 (4): 861–874. doi:10.1080/03057070701647025. ISSN 0305-7070.
  5. ^ Salafranca, Arja (20 September 2007). "Open Window Into Our World". The Star (South Africa). Archived from the original on 18 November 2018. Retrieved 7 March 2016 – via HighBeam Research.
  6. ^ a b "The Women Behind Our Springboks". The Star (South Africa). 9 September 2013. Archived from the original on 18 November 2018. Retrieved 7 March 2016 – via HighBeam Research.
  7. ^ Nicholoson, I. (13 November 2013). "Is a Pele Herding Cattle in Transkei? as Long as Much of Our Sporting Talent Remains Untapped, the Playing Fields Cannot Be Level". The Mercury (South Africa). Archived from the original on 18 November 2018. Retrieved 7 March 2016 – via HighBeam Research.
  8. ^ Kona, Bongani (18 October 2013). "Riveting Look at the Variables at Play in the Making of a Springbok". Cape Times (South Africa). Retrieved 7 March 2016 – via HighBeam Research.[dead link]
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Liz McGregor
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